Undersea Photography – Steven Wesley Photography http://stevenwesleyphotography.com/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 07:19:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Undersea Photography – Steven Wesley Photography http://stevenwesleyphotography.com/ 32 32 Travel: Oklahoma City Zoo Safari Lights Are Not To Be Missed | Community https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/travel-oklahoma-city-zoo-safari-lights-are-not-to-be-missed-community/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 19:30:00 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/travel-oklahoma-city-zoo-safari-lights-are-not-to-be-missed-community/ Wow – the Oklahoma City Zoo Safari Lights exceeded my expectations. I wasn’t particularly excited when I saw that they were going to make a holiday light display. I saw a lot of examples – Orchard Road in Singapore, New Years in Hong Kong, various exhibitions from cities across the country. I’m sure there are […]]]>

Wow – the Oklahoma City Zoo Safari Lights exceeded my expectations.

I wasn’t particularly excited when I saw that they were going to make a holiday light display. I saw a lot of examples – Orchard Road in Singapore, New Years in Hong Kong, various exhibitions from cities across the country.

I’m sure there are many more that are spectacular. But in Oklahoma, this one takes the Christmas cookie.

Yes, you will find some of the more common and flat figures, but the plethora of three-dimensional animated exhibits at the zoo are true works of art. More than 50 exhibits are scattered around the grounds of the zoo.

The complete experience is in two parts.

The first segment is a road trip that begins in the southern part of the zoo, near the elephants and big cats. It’s baffling to walk through the zoo in the dark – you won’t see the real animals so it was hard to tell exactly where we were. But don’t worry, just follow the car in front of you.

My first idea that this was going to be something really different was to walk through an entrance guarded by colorful dragons and past a wall of glowing red lanterns. The path, lined with pastel flowers, led to a bamboo forest where baby round pandas were frolicking.

The figurines, sculpted lanterns, are created from steel frames covered in translucent fabric and illuminated from the inside by LED lights. Each individual lantern takes several days to make.

The elaborate details are hand painted and are incredibly intricate and beautiful. It took 10 trucks to bring all the pieces to Oklahoma City, and a team of 30 artisans worked for over a month to create the zoo exhibit.

Photography was difficult on the drive; traffic must continue, albeit at a slow pace. A convertible, although cold, would be an ideal vehicle (vehicles include SUVs, but not RVs, limousines, or other permitted extra-large vehicles).

Make sure your front windshield is clean. Pulling out the front passenger window, I had harsh words for the side mirror.

The light displays present a wide variety of subjects, from fanciful or mythical animals and prehistoric creatures, to representations of species found in the zoo. These are interspersed with fantastic flowers, butterflies and stars.

Placement is hit or miss, with a grizzly family near grazing elephants, rhinos, and giraffes, while Tyrannosaurus rex and other fearsome beasts show their teeth nearby.

It’s hard to pick a favorite view, but the Zoo Bridge has to be at the top of my list. Giant flowers, frogs and dragonflies line the road; above the head, pink water lilies with large green water lilies hang upside down.

The ride ends in the zoo’s main parking lot. The driving portion of Safari Lights takes approximately 30 minutes.

It might seem expensive ($ 60 per vehicle for non-zoo members, $ 50 for ZOOfriends members), but tickets, which must be reserved in advance, include up to four bracelets for the passing part. .

Plan to arrive at least 15 minutes before your scheduled time – there will likely be a queue at the entrance. Enter via Remington Place / Grand Boulevard.

Once you exit the drive-thru, park and walk through the main entrance. Walk-in and in-car customers who require additional bracelets can purchase them here.

The highlight of the entrance plaza is a 10+ minute light show featuring the Miranda Family Lights, which premiered on ABC’s The Great Christmas Light Fight in 2019 (this includes strobe effects, so if you are sensitive to intensive lighting, you I want to jump quickly in this area).

It is possible to buy tickets only for the crossing part of the zoo, but if you plan to go there on a weekend evening, check if tickets are limited. Online purchase is suggested. The tour takes you through the petting zoo, past Stingray Bay and into the DINO SAFARI area.

Lanterns in this area include a Pegasus-pulled Cinderella-style carriage, a preparing peacock, sea turtles, and a giant crab with a bubble machine providing an underwater accent.

Particularly popular interactive elements in this section are large, lighted tire-type swings, musical stars to dance on, and a slide. Although Santa himself is gone after December 25, a giant Santa Claus lantern makes for a good photoshoot. Other activities available on limited nights are cookie decorating and more.

Tickets for the guided tour are $ 10 per person for ZOOfriends members and $ 12 for non-members over three years old. The Safari Lights experience is open every evening from 5:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. with the last admission no later than 10:30 p.m., until January 9.

For more details, visit the zoo’s website at okczoo.org. (FYI: this winter, the zoo is closed to day visitors on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.)

The Oklahoma City Zoo had one last holiday light show in 1992. Things have come a long way, baby. It is truly an opportunity not to be missed.


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Rare images of deep sea creatures unveiled – Oceanographic https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/rare-images-of-deep-sea-creatures-unveiled-oceanographic/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 10:59:41 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/rare-images-of-deep-sea-creatures-unveiled-oceanographic/ A robotic camera from MBARI’s ocean rover captured a few rare deep-sea creatures on film 3,200 feet below the sea. Doc Ricketts, one of the robotic rovers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), sports powerful HD cameras and LED lights to detect and record marine life in the deep sea. In recent months, […]]]>

A robotic camera from MBARI’s ocean rover captured a few rare deep-sea creatures on film 3,200 feet below the sea.

Doc Ricketts, one of the robotic rovers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), sports powerful HD cameras and LED lights to detect and record marine life in the deep sea. In recent months, the submersible has explored submarine canyons off central California, near the abyssal plains of the Pacific Ocean. New high-quality images of rarely seen deep-sea creatures have emerged.

A special sighting was that of a giant ghost jelly, a species that has only been seen a hundred times before. First described in 1910 and identified in the 1960s, the giant ghost jelly can extend up to 33 feet in length and sports four “mouth arms” that the species uses to catch its prey and walk on it. the water. The images highlight a species of which very little is known. The deep sea creature is expected to have worldwide distribution but does not appear to live in the Arctic.

The MBARI research team writes: “Historically, scientists have relied on trawls to study deep-sea animals. These nets can be effective in studying hardy animals such as fish, crustaceans, and squids, but the jellies turn into gelatinous goo in trawls. MBARI ROV cameras have enabled MBARI researchers to study these intact animals in their natural environment. High-definition – and now 4K – video of the giant ghost jelly captures amazing detail about the animal’s appearance and behaviors that scientists could not have seen with a trawled specimen.

Another special species captured on camera by the MBARI rover was the whale, a member of the Cetomimidae family. They have no scales or prominent fins and open their mouths to feed.

MBARI researchers also shared a clip of a barrel fish on their YouTube channel that was found over 2,000 feet deep in Monterey Bay. The species has a transparent head which is filled with liquid. This allows them to look up to scan the ocean for threats.

To find out more about our Ocean press room, Click here.

Photograph courtesy of MBARI (Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute) & Unsplash.


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INTERNATIONAL MOUNTAIN DAY https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/international-mountain-day/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 09:11:57 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/international-mountain-day/ 1 / 1 INTERNATIONAL MOUNTAIN DAY Q1. Why is it called “Mount Everest”? Q2. New Zealand has the name of the longest mountain in the world. The name holds the Guinness World Record and consists of 85 characters. The name of this mountain is? Q3. The Tibetan language what is called “QOMOLANGMA”? Q4. The most […]]]>

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INTERNATIONAL MOUNTAIN DAY

Q1. Why is it called “Mount Everest”?

Q2. New Zealand has the name of the longest mountain in the world. The name holds the Guinness World Record and consists of 85 characters. The name of this mountain is?

Q3. The Tibetan language what is called “QOMOLANGMA”?

Q4. The most famous mountain – the Mid-Atlantic Ridge while the highest mountain – Mount Vema. What is so unique about them?

Q5. It became popularly known as the “Wild Mountain” after George Bell, a mountaineer on the 1953 US Expedition, told reporters, “It’s a wild mountain trying to kill you.” What mountain is it from? it question here?

Q6. What a famous global luxury brand is named on the highest mountain in the Alps and Western Europe. Also means “white

Mountain” ?

Q7. Erik Weihenmayer is an American athlete, adventurer, author, activist and motivational speaker and has also reached the summit of Mount Everest. What is glory?

Q8. Olympus Mons is about two and a half times the height of Mount Everest above sea level. It is the tallest and tallest mountain. Where would you find it?

Q9. This is Apa Sherpa nicknamed “Super Sherpa”, what is he famous for?

Q10. Super click! In this beautiful photo there is something on which a brand has been named. Name the brand

ANSWERS

A1 It was named after Colonel Sir George Everest, a British surveyor and geographer who served as Surveyor General of India from 1830 to 1843. in honor of Everest

A2 Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateapokaiwhenuakitanatahu. When translated into English, the word means “the place where Tmatea, the man with the big knees, who slipped, climbed and swallowed mountains, known as the landeater, played his nasal flute to his beloved “.

A3 name for Everest which means “Holy Mother”

A4 Mid-Atlantic Ridge is the most famous underwater mountain while Mount Vema is the highest ocean mountain

A5 K2, the second highest mountain on Earth, it’s the deadliest; about one person dies on the mountain for every four people who reach the top

A6 Mont-Blanc

A7 On May 25, 2001, Erik Weihenmayer became the first blind[visually challenged] to reach the top of Mount Everest In 2005, he co-founded No Barriers, a non-profit organization whose slogan is “What is in you is stronger than what is in your path.”

A8 On the planet Mars, the highest known mountain in the solar system

A9 Apa Sherpa, a Nepalese Sherpa mountaineer holds the record for successfully reaching the summit of Mount Everest for twenty-one times, breaking his own record for the most successful climbs

A10 FUJIFILM A corporation, named after Mount Fuji in Japan, is a Japanese multinational conglomerate headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, operating in the fields of photography, optics, office electronics and medical, biotechnology and chemicals.


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Theater Under the Stars’ THE LITTLE MERMAID is a timeless tale brimming with talent https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/theater-under-the-stars-the-little-mermaid-is-a-timeless-tale-brimming-with-talent/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 15:38:12 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/theater-under-the-stars-the-little-mermaid-is-a-timeless-tale-brimming-with-talent/ It’s vacation time in Houston, and that means big, bold and festive shows all season long! As such, LA PETITE SIRÈNE has arrived at the Theater under the stars! With music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Howard Ashman and Glenn Slater, and a book by Doug Wright, this production does justice to your favorite childhood […]]]>

It’s vacation time in Houston, and that means big, bold and festive shows all season long! As such, LA PETITE SIRÈNE has arrived at the Theater under the stars! With music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Howard Ashman and Glenn Slater, and a book by Doug Wright, this production does justice to your favorite childhood movie and more.


Oh, to be back in the theater. The novelty has not yet faded. Is there anything better than sitting in the dark respectful of the audience, listening to the opening as you settle into a story? (The answer is no. Bring openings everywhere.) So begins THE LITTLE MERMAID, and from there, it’s full speed!

BWW REVIEW: THE LITTLE MERMAID from Theater Under the Stars is a timeless tale brimming with talent
Delphi Borich as Ariel in Disney’s The Little Mermaid.
Photograph by Melissa Taylor

For starters, this casting is no joke. You have Delphi Borich (certified Disney Princess in real life) returning to the TUTS stage, this time as Ariel. Then there’s Noah J. Ricketts as Prince Eric, bringing depth and affection to the royal archetype (with a voice like butter, I might add). In legs, the show-woman Carla Woods, commanding the scene as Sebastian and sporting one of my favorite costumes of all time of the night. Top it off with Christopher Tipps as Scuttle with loot, Mark Ivy as Chef Louis, and Christina Wells as villainous Ursula – and you’ve got a SHOW. I would happily pay to watch this crowd shopping on the weekends at Trader Joe’s and they would still make it a knockout.

Not to mention the lively ensemble that completes the scene with all kinds of underwater life courtesy of students from two TUTS schools, The Humphrey’s School of Musical Theater and The River. Young talent Lia Zitvar (Flounder) blew me away in the number “She’s In Love”, and I always love to spot the smiles of recurring TUTS students on stage.

BWW REVIEW: THE LITTLE MERMAID from Theater Under the Stars is a timeless tale brimming with talent
Carla Woods as Sebastian, Derrick Davis as
King Triton and the cast of The Little Mermaid.
Photograph by Melissa Taylor

As expected, “Under the Sea” blows everything out of the water. This oceanic parade is an ode to the sharp talent of the costume team (Vincent Seasselati, Kenneth Burrell and Colleen Grady). I don’t want to spoil the surprises, but it’s a delight from start to finish. “Kiss the Girl,” directed by Carla Woods’ Sebastian, is another unforgettable moment. The two numbers were a kaleidoscope of colors, movements, textures and sounds. All the best parts of the theater wrapped in a bow. And yes, I cried. Because the theater.

The artistry of choreographer Harrison Guy shone in “One Step Closer”, as Prince Eric and Ariel moved around the ballroom with both playfulness and poise. It was an unexpected number for me; I could have watched them dance while John Cornelius conducted the orchestra for an hour and called it a night.

Magical moments aside, this show has its challenges because, well, audiences are supposed to believe the characters are underwater half the time. I’ve seen it done in different ways: rollerblading or heels, an emphasis on continuous fluid motion, and so on. It’s hard to say if there really is a way to fully accomplish it, or if it should even be the goal, but the intentionally atmospheric approach to this production pays off. Creating a believable underwater world is indeed a challenge, but one that lighting designers Charlie Morrison and John Burkland confidently rise to alongside set designer Kenneth Foy, wig designer Kelley Jordan and projection designer. Caïte Hevner.

BWW REVIEW: THE LITTLE MERMAID from Theater Under the Stars is a timeless tale brimming with talent
Logan Keslar (Flotsam), Christina Wells (Ursula) and
Blair Medina (Jetsam) in The Little Mermaid by TUTS.
Photograph by Melissa Taylor

There is a together lots of things you can do with lighting and sound, and to showcase the underwater world built by Foy. Dressed head-to-toe in ready-made wigs and flamboyant fish-shaped clothing, this production could practically pass for a fashion show. TUTS adds a few tips here and there for some pretty clever mermaid moments under the direction of the art director, Dan Knechtges. Hevner’s ever-flowing projections also add a lot to the underwater illusion (watch out for an extra-fab moment of evil Ursula too!). Andrew Harper’s sound design was the icing on the cake, making the experience of each song even better.

If you are looking for a reason to attend, I will give you more than one. Come see Christina Wells slaying poor hapless souls and her mighty sea witch cackle echoing throughout the theater. Come for Mark Ivy as Chef Louis, being pure comedic gold as always. Come in for the unwavering comedic intensity of Carla Woods as Sebastian, putting stakes in every scene. Come experience the artistry of the design team, from wig designer Kelley Jordan’s electric Ursula and Ariel’s cascading red locks to the sparkling movement and intricacy of Foy’s stage design. Come on stage for the students of The River to have a blast (and bring your tissues while you’re at it).

BWW REVIEW: THE LITTLE MERMAID from Theater Under the Stars is a timeless tale brimming with talent
The cast of Disney’s The Little Mermaid
Theater under the stars,
Photograph by Melissa Taylor

If there is anything to criticize here, it is that you should always know which show you are entering. THE LITTLE MERMAID is still THE LITTLE MERMAID, and no amount of epic costumes or sentimentality will change that. If that’s not your thing, it’s not your thing. It’s going to be cheesy, because it’s Disney after all. But if you feel like putting your disbelief on hold for a night and being a kid again for a few hours, I recommend spending your evening here.

The Little Mermaid takes place December 7-24 at the Hobby Center for the Performing Arts. Tickets start at just $ 40 and are available online at TUTS.com, or by contacting the TUTS ticket office by phone at (713) 558-8887 or in person by visiting the ticket office located at 800, rue Bagby.

COVID-19 protocols:

All customers aged 12 and over will be required to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test result or proof of vaccination, at the customer’s discretion, and photo identification. Masks are mandatory for all customers and staff inside the Hobby Center.


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Obituary of SAMUEL RAYMOND (1928 – 2021) – Falmouth, MA https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/obituary-of-samuel-raymond-1928-2021-falmouth-ma/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 18:36:00 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/obituary-of-samuel-raymond-1928-2021-falmouth-ma/ RAYMOND, Samuel Otis Adventurer, inventor and oceanographic engineer, dies at age 93 From ice diving at the North Pole with the National Geographic Society to exploring ancient Tibetan culture with his daughter, Sam Raymond has led a full life adventures, trips around the world, endless curiosity and innovation. Son of inventor Horace Raymond, Sam graduated […]]]>
RAYMOND, Samuel Otis Adventurer, inventor and oceanographic engineer, dies at age 93 From ice diving at the North Pole with the National Geographic Society to exploring ancient Tibetan culture with his daughter, Sam Raymond has led a full life adventures, trips around the world, endless curiosity and innovation. Son of inventor Horace Raymond, Sam graduated from MIT with a BS in Mechanical Engineering in 1950. After graduation, he worked with his former teacher and mentor, Dr Harold Edgerton, eventually leading the Division of Mechanical Engineering. ocean products at EG&G. His love for the ocean, his interest in photography, and his skills as a mechanical engineer led Sam to found Benthos Undersea Systems in North Falmouth, MA in 1962. Benthos became a leader in the design and manufacture of equipment for ocean science and underwater photography. Sam and Benthos have contributed to many important oceanographic research expeditions for organizations such as the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute and the National Geographic Society. Benthos equipment was used to capture the first photographs of the wreck of the RMS Titanic at the bottom of the sea, as well as filming underwater footage for James Cameron’s film Titanic. Sam enjoyed scuba diving, skiing, caving, hiking, trail biking, travel and music, playing jazz on the piano and clarinet. His urge to travel has taken him to travel the world, often with little more than a small backpack and his trusty ukulele, traveling by bus and staying in hostels. Driven by boundless curiosity, Sam enjoyed tinkering, figuring out how things work, and imagining ways to make them work better. He was curious, creative, and unafraid to risk failure, convinced that he could solve any problem and leave the world in a better place than he found it. Sam is survived by his children Eric, Vaun, Nixie and Monica; his brother Georges; brother-in-law Jack Heinzmann; grandsons Morgan and Jesse; and his first wife Heidi, the mother of his children. He was predeceased by his wife Holly Nichols Raymond, his brother Richard and his sister Jean Heinzmann. To watch a two part video biography of Sam, Google “The Adventures of Sam Raymond”. For a full obituary and guestbook, visit https://beautifultribute.com/samuel-otis-raymond/ A Celebration of Life will be scheduled for summer 2022 in North Falmouth, MA. See the guestbook on the above website for more details.

See the Samuel Otis RAYMOND online memorial

Published by Boston Globe December 4-5, 2021.


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12 magical things to do on the island of Rotoroa https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/12-magical-things-to-do-on-the-island-of-rotoroa/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 01:46:31 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/12-magical-things-to-do-on-the-island-of-rotoroa/ If you haven’t heard of the island of Rotoroa then you had better make it up, stat, because you’re definitely missing out on something. The newest Hauraki Gulf Wildlife Sanctuary promises island-worthy vibes, minus the long roadie and with plenty of native wildlife. The Fullers 360 ferry drops you off in the morning and picks […]]]>

If you haven’t heard of the island of Rotoroa then you had better make it up, stat, because you’re definitely missing out on something. The newest Hauraki Gulf Wildlife Sanctuary promises island-worthy vibes, minus the long roadie and with plenty of native wildlife.

The Fullers 360 ferry drops you off in the morning and picks you up in the early evening so you have a full day to revel in the 82.5 acres of lush island life. Alternatively, you can rent a place to stay and make it an entire weekend. Dreamer.

Here are the best things to do on the island of Rotoroa.

Drink in the harbor view

So technically it’s not on the island of Rotoroa but the trip is so beautiful it deserves a mention. The 75-minute ferry ride will give you stunning views of the eastern beaches of Tāmaki Makaurau, such as Mission Bay, summer’s favorite, as well as Mellon Bay, Duder Regional Park, Brown Island , Waiheke and the sparkling blue waters of the Hauraki Gulf.

Jump from beach to beach

Although it may be small, the island of Rotoroa is home to five stunning beaches: Ladies’ Bay, Men’s Bay, Home Bay, Mai Mai Bay and Cable Bay, each their own slice of paradise. Unroll your towel, put on your kit, apply sunscreen and enjoy, or snorkel in the water for an underwater experience.

Refresh your story

Owned by the Salvation Army, Rotoroa Island has been operated for 108 years as a rehabilitation center, the first and oldest of its kind in New Zealand. Plot ? There are a number of historic buildings on site and the fairground is home to a small, award-winning museum that paints a living picture of the island’s history. We especially love Ann Shelton’s ROOM ROOM photography.

Relax in a sound bath

Indulge in the sounds of nature as you relax under the pohutukawa trees to the buzz of bees, or stretch out on the grass amid a symphony of birdsong. This is self-care at its best.

Stay the night in accommodation on the island of Rotoroa

Although there are no campsites on the island of Rotoroa, there are four restored buildings in which you can sleep six to eighteen people. Explore the island on your own, once the ferry leaves for the evening, find the perfect vantage point to watch the sunset and contemplate the Rotoroa night sky, sights few can experience.

Picnic like never before

Aucklanders are becoming especially good at hosting picnics, and Rotoroa Island is the perfect way to take your picnic game to the next level. With an abundance of perfect picnic areas and several free electric barbecues dotted around the island, you’re all set. Just be sure to bring all your food in sealed containers to avoid the clandestine skinks and take all your trash home with you.

Several people rock hop on an island in Rotoroa at sunset. Go to the coast

Are you looking for something a little out of the ordinary? Going around the coast of the island might be the ideal solution, provided you are prepared to climb, climb and wade. Allow about four and a half hours to complete the loop, ideally starting two hours before low tide.

Put on your Shinrin-Yoku

Shinrin-yoku is all about connecting to the atmosphere of a forest that has been shown to reduce stress levels. Rotoroa Island boasts over 350,000 native New Zealand trees, including over 25 different species, making it the perfect place to relax with these forest vibes. Fun fact: This large volume of trees removes twice the carbon emitted on Rotoroa, making it a carbon neutral island.

Trek from round to round

A great way to see the whole island is to hike from the North Tower to the South Tower. This walk combines two loop circuits and is filled with breathtaking views and chance encounters with native birds and flora. The South Tower Loop also features an atmospheric sculpture called “Kaitiaki” or “Guardian of the Island” by sculptor Chris Booth.

A black bird with an orange saddle-shaped mark on its back, perched on a branch. Make feathered friends

On the island of Rotoroa you can walk alongside some of Aotearoa’s most endangered species and isn’t that a total honor? The island is a nursery site for Coromandel Brown Kiwi, duck pāteke – the rarest waterfowl on the mainland – and takahē. It is also home to other native birds, such as the tīeke (pictured) and the weka.

Make common stock exchange

If you have a green thumb and are inspired by the incredible work the Rotoroa Island Trust is doing, you can lend a helping hand. Become a regular volunteer specializing in visitor experience, trail maintenance and development or biosecurity or sign up for a unique volunteer day.

Green your “gram”

Cut through the sea of ​​Instagram selfies and instead cultivate a digital sanctuary with photoshoots held on the island. From wedding photography to website assets with a lasting feel, the island is a setting like no other.

More in the mood for Waiheke? Here are 15 epic things to do there without drinking wine.

Image credit: Rotoroa Island NZ, Alice Rich, Carlo Domingo, Rotoroa Island NZ.


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a deadly encounter in prison, a celebrity chef and the current pandemic https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/a-deadly-encounter-in-prison-a-celebrity-chef-and-the-current-pandemic/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 03:52:47 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/a-deadly-encounter-in-prison-a-celebrity-chef-and-the-current-pandemic/ Feature documentaries have become one of the most competitive categories at the Oscars. If the trend continues, entries vying for the 2022 shortlist could surpass last year’s record of 238. Here’s a quick look at three candidates vying for a spot on the list, which will be announced on December 21. The films explore the […]]]>

Feature documentaries have become one of the most competitive categories at the Oscars. If the trend continues, entries vying for the 2022 shortlist could surpass last year’s record of 238. Here’s a quick look at three candidates vying for a spot on the list, which will be announced on December 21. The films explore the life of a revolutionary leader and television personality, a deadly prison rebellion, and the chaotic struggle to save lives amid a world-changing pandemic.

‘Julia’

This has been a busy year for documentaries about singular cultural figures who also became television pioneers, with subjects such as underwater explorer Jacques Cousteau and conductor-composer Leonard Bernstein. The most colorful, however, is Julia Child, whose public television show “The French Chef” first showed a spam-satisfied 1960s America how to pronounce – and cook – beef bourguignon, among many. other classic dishes.

In “Julia,” a Sony Pictures Classic release, filmmakers Julie Cohen and Betsy West, whose 2018 documentary Ruth Bader Ginsburg “RBG” was nominated for an Oscar, celebrate another revolutionary woman who broke with norms and changed his time. “She was tall, she was loud, she knew what she was talking about and she wasn’t afraid to talk about it,” Cohen said. “From the minute she appeared on TV, audiences loved her because she was genuine herself. She was not young. She was a woman who was already 50 years old.

Child, who died in 2004 at the age of 91, is renowned for having co-authored the 12-year-old cookbook “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” (1961). The filmmakers take the time to map Child’s life before this turning point, sparked by her World War romance with Paul Child, whom she met when they both worked for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. Archival letters, diary entries and photographs bring the passion to life, as well as a score by English composer Rachel Portman. “If people choose to see our movie as a date movie, that’s fine,” Cohen said.

Paul Child’s photography has also been a godsend, offering comedic behind-the-scenes shots of early TV productions as well as surprisingly intimate glimpses. “We weren’t expecting to find a nude photo of Julia Child, but here it is,” West said, “along with a lot of other very sultry pics of someone that doesn’t automatically make you think they were sex. symbol, but for Paul Child it was.

‘Attica’

Its release coinciding with the 50th anniversary of the 1971 uprising at the Attica Correctional Facility in upstate New York, “Attica” posed chronological urgency to its filmmakers, Stanley Nelson and Traci Curry. “The people who survived Attica, who had clear memories of being there, they were getting older,” said Nelson, a three-time Emmy Award winner whose documentaries include “Freedom Riders” and “Black Panthers” : Vanguard of the Revolution “. “It was a real push to do it now to include them while they were still dynamic.”

These subjects, which include not only former prisoners but also journalists, prison guards, observers, family members and residents of the village of Attica, are at the heart of the film. “It became clear from the start that this was going to be a story told by the people who went through it,” said Curry, who conducted the interviews. After armed state police broke into the prison on the orders of New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller, 43 people were killed, including prisoners, correctional officers and prison employees. “It’s a deep trauma for everyone who lived it, every person.… There were a lot of tears, a lot of rage at the injustice on all sides.

The Showtime film makes extensive use of television news footage, a reminder that the Attica uprising was a major media event, but delves into the often shocking previously obscured images and emotional testimonies of John Johnson, an ABC News correspondent who was at the scene. “What happens with these films is that people use the same film over and over again,” Nelson said. “We had to constantly come back [to archival sources] and say, ‘No, we want to see everything. We want to see all you’ve got.

“The first wave”

Dangerous areas are a favorite ground for filmmaker Matthew Heineman, who has turned his camera on the Mexican drug cartels (Oscar nominee “Cartel Land”), the opioid crisis (Docuseries “The Trade”) and journalists. Syrians documenting ISIS (“Ghost City”) atrocities. His latest film, shot in a Queens hospital as the COVID-19 pandemic hit New York in 2020, proved more off-putting than any which of his previous projects.

“It was by far the most terrifying thing I have done,” said Heineman, “because we were going through the same thing that we were documenting.” Integrated for months at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center, the filmmaker and his small crew filmed for up to 18 hours a day in cramped and hectic spaces as healthcare providers struggled desperately to bring the deadly and mysterious virus under control.

“The First Wave,” a Neon theatrical release in partnership with National Geographic, joins a growing category of pandemic-themed documentaries including “76 Days”, “In the Same Breath” and “Totally Under Control”. This Tale of Truth, however, centers around a handful of topics, including passionate doctor Natalie Dougé and a New York Police Department school safety officer named Ahmed Ellis, a father whose fight for life becomes one. checkpoint.

Dougé, who becomes the driving spirit of the film, also opened the story to the broader social implications of the pandemic, which corresponded to the most explosive moments of the Black Lives Matter protests. “She was so clearly able to express the fear of the moment, but she was also opening up emotionally,” Heineman said. “We have become quite close, and through that trust and through that bond, we have been able to explore many other issues that have emerged in those four months.”

This story originally appeared in the Los Angeles Times.


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Dive into the world’s best underwater attractions https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/dive-into-the-worlds-best-underwater-attractions/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/dive-into-the-worlds-best-underwater-attractions/ Water covers 71% of the Earth’s surface and more than 80% of it remains to be explored. But in the roughly 20% or so, humanity has come to know some of the world’s most extraordinary natural and man-made wonders, many of which are surprisingly accessible to anyone with a sense of aquatic adventure. To get […]]]>

Water covers 71% of the Earth’s surface and more than 80% of it remains to be explored. But in the roughly 20% or so, humanity has come to know some of the world’s most extraordinary natural and man-made wonders, many of which are surprisingly accessible to anyone with a sense of aquatic adventure.

To get the best value for money underwater, you should head to the Caribbean Sea. From the east coast of Mexico to Belize lies a long hotspot of treasure. The natural sites in particular are impressive thanks to

the far-reaching limestone peninsula that has created a vast array of spectacular sights – from sinkholes that developed into cenotes, to massive sea holes and intricate tunnel systems.

Perhaps best known of all from Jacques Cousteau’s explorations in the 1970s is the Great Blue Hole, just 60 miles off the coast of Belize in the UNESCO Barrier Reef Reserve System of UNESCO. At around 410 feet deep and 984 feet in diameter, it is one of the deepest and largest underwater holes in the world – and one of the most prestigious dive sites known especially for training. geological aspects of its coral reefs.

Not far away, in a bay west of Clarence Town on Long Island in the Bahamas and not to be outdone, Dean’s Blue Hole is even deeper at 650 feet and up to 155 feet in diameter.

Elsewhere, the Cenote Angelita near the tourist hotspot of Tulum offers something incredibly unusual – an underwater river. Created by a layer of hydrogen sulfate separating the salty water flowing at the bottom from the fresh water flowing at the top, it comes to life as a strange floating cotton cloud drifting in the strangely lit ocean. in green when viewed from below.

It is not just about the natural attractions available. Struck by an earthquake in 1692 and a tsunami soon after, some 33 acres of the pirate town of Port Royal in Jamaica (once known as “the wickedest town in the world”) was dragged into the sea where it now sits 40 feet underwater, creating one of the most extensive, extraordinary and accessible dive sites in the world. Located at the end of the Palisadoes at the mouth of Kingston Harbor in southeast Jamaica, you can dive it all year round thanks to the temperate waters but visibility is best during the summer months.

For something man-made and on purpose, head to the Granada Underwater Sculpture Park at Molinere Point. Particularly popular because you can snorkel there without the need for scuba gear, this underwater park features individual sculptures that act as an artificial reef on which marine life can thrive. Highlights include the Vicissitudes, a circle of 26 children holding hands, and The Lost Correspondent, also known as the “man from the diary”. Returning to Nassau, Ocean Atlas is the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater, reaching approximately 16 feet from the seabed to the surface and weighing over sixty tons.

It is not only in the oceans that you will find underwater wonders to explore. Head inland from Europe to Asia and into the Tian Shan Mountains of Kazakhstan and you will find the absolutely insane sunken forest of Lake Kaindy formed from a post-earthquake landslide that has flooded a forest and created a natural dam preserving it perfectly in the icy waters. With trees emerging like toothpicks from the water, it’s spectacular even from land, but dive in and you’ll encounter a ghostly blue-green world where perfectly preserved trees have been caught on underwater plants and algae. marines to create a strange new world.

Russia’s Baikal Lake in Siberia contains just over 20% of the world’s freshwater and is the world’s largest freshwater lake by volume. With that, it is home to freshwater flora and fauna that thrive alongside over 2,500 species of animals, many of which are unique to the region – which is why it is known as ” Galapagos of Russia ”. Speaking of cold water, there are fewer places that are cooler and brighter than the completely unique Silfra Fissure. A rift between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates in Thingvellir National Park, its glacial waters offer visibility of around 100 meters to 330 feet and the only place you can dive between continents – cool!

Of course, we couldn’t talk about underwater attractions without mentioning the biggest of them – Australia’s unsurpassable Great Barrier Reef in the Coral Sea. The most sought after and famous of all underwater attractions, its 1430 miles of diving offers nearly 3000 reefs and 900 islands, not to mention individual treasures such as the wreck of the SS Yongala, one of the dive sites. the largest, best preserved and most mysterious off the Australian coast – and the one that is most alive with marine life.

If you love the ocean but aren’t really interested in diving into it wholeheartedly, there are plenty of other options to get your aquatic fix, especially if you have deep enough pockets. If you are heading to the Maldives, you can dine 5 meters deep in the Ithaa Undersea restaurant at Conrad Maldives Rangali Island or go further and sleep soundly in every sense of the word at your very own underwater residence in Muraka.

But for the ultimate underwater experience (with a matching price tag), a stay in the world’s most expensive hotel room will immerse you in a whole new way. Lovers Deep is a specially adapted ultra-luxury submarine anchored off the coast of Saint Lucia in the Caribbean that can take you on tailor-made submarine trips organized by a team of three – your own captain, chef and butler – for the princely sum of £ 175,000 (or $ 235,000) a night.

To learn more and plan your own aquatic itinerary, check out this interactive map of the world’s best and most popular underwater attractions from SportsCover Direct.


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The man who taught humans to breathe like a fish https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/the-man-who-taught-humans-to-breathe-like-a-fish/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:48:45 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/the-man-who-taught-humans-to-breathe-like-a-fish/ Become Cousteau, which is now playing in theaters, begins airing on Disney + on November 24. “Look,” my son said. We were floating in the shade of a jetty on Isla Vieques in Puerto Rico. Wooden slats a few meters above our heads protected us from the tropical sun. The weather-beaten pillars have disappeared under […]]]>

Become Cousteau, which is now playing in theaters, begins airing on Disney + on November 24.

“Look,” my son said.

We were floating in the shade of a jetty on Isla Vieques in Puerto Rico. Wooden slats a few meters above our heads protected us from the tropical sun. The weather-beaten pillars have disappeared under the water’s surface. It was cool there but barren – a man-made place only suitable for a quick rest on our first foray into snorkeling.

Will pointed down. His eyes were wide behind his mask. He dipped his head under the water. I followed.

We have entered another world. Above the water’s surface, the pier was a drab structure of warped wood and peeling paint. Beneath the surface it teemed with life: orange and yellow corals wrapped around the columns, lush sea plants rippling in the current, schools of silvery fish streaking between the poles. This narrow place under a dock built decades ago for American warships was as fruitful as any jungle, but unlike a jungle, we could float in the middle and examine it from all angles.

We never imagined being surrounded by so many wild animals and yet that was not enough for Will. “It was so cool,” he said as we walked back to the hotel in our guides’ doorbell van. “I want to try scuba diving. He didn’t want to be tied to the surface by our rented snorkels. He dreamed of diving deeper, exploring the ocean more, seeing its wonders for himself.

(Discover five ways Cousteau pushed to protect the environment.)

Although Cousteau learned to swim at the age of four, his first ambitions were for the sky, not the sea. In 1930, he entered the French Naval Academy to become a pilot, a dream sidetracked by a car accident almost mortal who fractured both arms. As part of his convalescence, his fellow naval officer Philippe Tailliez suggested that he try ocean swimming. Tailliez lent him a pair of glasses and took him underwater hunting in the Mediterranean near Toulon, France.

Swimming with the goggles was a revelation. “As soon as I put my head under the water I got it, a shock,” he said later. He had discovered “an immense and totally virgin domain to explore”.

“I understood that from that day on, all my free time would be spent exploring underwater.

Eventually, it could go up to 60 feet deep and stay there for 70 to 80 seconds. But it wasn’t long enough or deep enough for Cousteau. “I have always rebelled against the limitations imposed by a single breath of air,” he wrote in a 1952 article for National geography, his first for the magazine.

Cousteau had to find his own solution. “I became an inventor out of necessity,” he said.

To go further, he needed a device that would provide breathable air that also matches the pressure of the water: as a diver goes further, the pressure increases, reducing the volume of air. in the body and potentially causing the lungs to collapse. Cousteau’s father-in-law put him in touch with engineer Émile Gagnan, who specializes in high pressure pneumatic design.

It was in the middle of World War II and Germany controlled most of France. Gagnan worked for the country’s largest commercial gas company in Paris, where he designed a valve that regulated the flow of fuel, allowing cars to run on cooking oil, an essential wartime adaptation when Nazis had requisitioned all gasoline for motor vehicles.

When Cousteau traveled to Paris in 1942 to explain the air pressure problem to Gagnan, the engineer thought his gas regulator might be the solution. Together, they tinkered with it until they had something to test, a regulator attached by tubes to two compressed air cartridges. Cousteau took the prototype for a swim in the Marne east of Paris.

“I took normal breaths at a slow pace,” he said, “I put my head down and swam slowly up to 30 feet.”

The device operated, while it was horizontal. When he was standing there was an air leak. Cousteau and Gagnan rearranged the intake and exhaust tubes so that they were at the same level. Eventually, they got a version that Cousteau felt comfortable trying out in the sea.

For many months in 1943, Cousteau, Tailliez and their friend Frédéric Dumas carefully tested the device they called the Aqualung. They have done over 500 dives in the Mediterranean, going a little further each time. By early fall they had reached 130 feet. By October, Dumas had descended 90 feet more.

“The best way to observe a fish is to become a fish”, wrote Cousteau in this first National geography article. “And the best way to become a fish – or a reasonable facsimile of it – is to don an underwater breathing apparatus called an Aqualung. The Aqualung frees a man so that he can slide, without hurrying and without being injured, in the depths of the sea. ”

Almost 80 years after its invention, the same basic design is still in use. “It’s as simple and elegant as a doorknob,” says a long time ago National geography underwater photographer David Doubilet. “It doesn’t fail. In 65 years of diving, I have never failed.

But the ability to probe the depths exposed divers to other dangers. Although the Aqualung made breathing easier by balancing ambient and internal pressure, it could not prevent what early divers called “depth removal”: nitrogen narcosis, when nitrogen bubbles develop in the bloodstream as the diver descends. For Cousteau, it was “an impression of euphoria, a gradual loss of control over reflexes, a loss of the instinct of self-preservation.” For Albert Falco, who sailed with Cousteau for almost 40 years, “the air takes on a strange taste and you get drunk on your own”.

Nitrogen narcosis could be fatal. After the war in 1947, Cousteau, who was still in the French Navy as part of his Underwater Research Group, organized scuba diving tests in Toulon. He wanted to demonstrate that Aqualung would allow divers to go to more than 100 meters deep. But the person behind the first attempt, the second Maurice Fargues, has died. He had passed out at 120 meters (390 feet) and was frantically pulled to the surface but could not be revived.

Cousteau is devastated: “I’m starting to wonder if what I’m doing makes sense.

For the French Navy, he did it. They deployed the Underwater Research Group to clean up the deadly after-effects of WWII in the Mediterranean. Navy divers have removed cleverly hidden mines near busy ports. They recovered the dead pilots from the downed planes. They witnessed the underwater destruction of a war that had encompassed the entire sea coast.

“I put the stuff on and went to the bottom of the pool,” recalls Doubilet, who would then photograph the Sargasso Sea, the Great Barrier Reef and a large part of the ocean in between for over 70 years old. National geography featured stories. “I was glued to the bottom, but I was breathing, and it was just heavenly.”

“The Aqualung regulator meant a passport for 70% of our planet,” explains Doubilet. “He is a person whose importance to the planet can never, never be forgotten or underestimated.”

Photographer Laurent Ballesta, who grew up swimming, snorkeling and scuba diving on the French Mediterranean coast, was also influenced by Cousteau. When Ballesta was 16, he was with friends on a boat when they were suddenly surrounded by sharks. Based on his avid viewing of Cousteau’s documentaries, he recognized them as harmless basking sharks and jumped into the water to swim with them.

When Ballesta returned home, he told his parents what had happened, but they didn’t believe him. “It was then that I decided I had to learn photography.”

Since then, Ballesta has discovered a new species of fish called the Andromeda goby and was the first to photograph the prehistoric coelacanth underwater. More recently he has recounted for National geography an expedition in which he and his crew lived for 28 days in a pressurized capsule that allowed them to dive for hours into the depths of the Mediterranean.

(In this episode of our podcast Understood, we chat with photographers David Doubilet and Laurent Ballesta about how they were inspired to follow in Cousteau’s footsteps by making discoveries during their own amazing and sometimes terrifying adventures. Listen now on Apple Podcasts.)

Jacques Cousteau remained active in underwater exploration until his death at the age of 87 in 1997. “My job was to show what was in the sea – its beauties – so that people get to know and know about it and to love the sea, ”Cousteau wrote.

It is a world which, despite its pioneering contributions and international influence, is still largely unrecognized. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, more than 80% of our planet’s oceans remain unexplored.

In the 78 years that Cousteau and Gagnan invented the Aqualung, more than 28 million people have followed it in the ocean and learned to dive.

This spring, my son and I will join them. This is what Will wanted for his 17th birthday: a passport to another world.


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Ridley Scott blames Millennials for ‘the Last Duel’ box office bomb https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/ridley-scott-blames-millennials-for-the-last-duel-box-office-bomb/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/ridley-scott-blames-millennials-for-the-last-duel-box-office-bomb/ Ridley Scott attends the “Alien: Covenant” World Premiere at Odeon Leicester Square on May 4th … [+] 2017 in London, England. (Photo by Mike Marsland / WireImage) getty Legendary director Ridley Scott recently appeared on Marc Maron’s show WTF podcast to talk about his long career, as well as his last two films, The last […]]]>

Legendary director Ridley Scott recently appeared on Marc Maron’s show WTF podcast to talk about his long career, as well as his last two films, The last duel and to come Gucci House.

The last duel, which was released exclusively in theaters in late October, has been completely erased at the box office, making just $ 27 million worldwide on a budget of $ 100 million. Any theatrical exclusivity released during the pandemic runs the risk of plummeting at the box office (especially a historical drama featuring a graphic rape scene), but Scott believes the blame lies entirely with millennials. On the podcast, Scott said:

“I think it boils down to – what we have today [are] the audience that was raised on those fucking cell phones. Millennials never want to be taught anything unless we say it over the phone… That’s a big line, but I think we’re talking about it on Facebook right now. It’s a bad direction that happened when we put bad faith in this last generation, I think. “

There is something endearing about how terribly out of touch Scott is here. First, its catch-all use of the term millennials, which at this point seems to refer to anyone vaguely young who had access to the internet as a child (for some reason Gen X is rarely mentioned in the Generation Wars). .

Second, Scott sincerely believes that young people today are led astray by Facebook (their parents could be, but TikTok and Instagram are currently responsible for corrupting young minds).

Additionally, millennials were hardly the target audience for The last duel anyway – the last duel they watched was probably from Game of thrones. In 2021, a historical drama starring Matt Damon and Ben Affleck almost looks like a relic from a forgotten age; not to mention the fact that there’s something inevitably modern about both actors – they just don’t seem to fit the period.

Their hilarious hairstyles, which would not have seemed out of place in a SNL skit, were the only reason the film seemed to be mentioned on Twitter, and even then, it was either a tongue-in-cheek appreciation or outright mockery.

Of course, we can’t expect Scott to stay afloat on the ever-changing sea of ​​online content and trends – the 83-year-old director is a living legend, having given the world both Extraterrestrial and Blade runner, apparently able to make a movie in his sleep at this point.

Hope Gucci House resonates with audiences upon its release, or Scott’s opinion of these phone-addicted millennials will more than collapse. The last duel ticket numbers.



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