Photography Festival – Steven Wesley Photography http://stevenwesleyphotography.com/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:31:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Photography Festival – Steven Wesley Photography http://stevenwesleyphotography.com/ 32 32 Blooming Marvels: Where To Find 10 Of Britain’s Best Snowdrop Displays | Short breaks https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/blooming-marvels-where-to-find-10-of-britains-best-snowdrop-displays-short-breaks/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 13:50:00 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/blooming-marvels-where-to-find-10-of-britains-best-snowdrop-displays-short-breaks/ Cringletie House Hotel, Peeblesshire It is said that soldiers returning from Crimea brought back the first snowdrops from Cringletie. Thanks to a 30-year garden restoration program, the grounds of this 28-acre estate on the Scottish borders are generously stocked with them and the nature trail is free to all. Other highlights include a walled garden […]]]>

Cringletie House Hotel, Peeblesshire

It is said that soldiers returning from Crimea brought back the first snowdrops from Cringletie. Thanks to a 30-year garden restoration program, the grounds of this 28-acre estate on the Scottish borders are generously stocked with them and the nature trail is free to all. Other highlights include a walled garden dating from the 16th century and the 19th century Cringletie House has 16 lovely bedrooms, afternoon tea and warming fires.
Double from £ 250 Bed and breakfast, cringletie.com

Walsingham Abbey, Norfolk

White Magic: Little Walsingham Abbey in Norfolk is the best place in East Anglia to see snowdrops. Photograph: Ashley Cooper photos / Alamy

Mixed in with the ruins of a crumbling 13th century monastery, this is one of the best places in East Anglia to surround yourself with snowdrops. Spread across 18 acres, including an ancient pack-horse bridge, woods, and under the Dell Gate, millions of snowdrops have divided and thrived over the centuries. The neighboring village of Little Walsingham also embraces snowdrops in its gardens and greens, and the Black Lion is a chic pub with rooms (doubles from £ 125 B&B).
Adult £ 6, walsinghamabbey.com

Walled Gardens Easton, Lincolnshire

Snowdrop Sanctuary: Enjoy the scent in Easton in Lincolnshire.
Snowdrop Sanctuary: Enjoy the scent in Easton in Lincolnshire. Photography: Fred Cholmeley

On a sunny day, areas of Easton are sufficiently sheltered for the delicate honeyed scent of a snowdrop to emerge. A snowdrop sanctuary for over 500 years, Easton Gardens reopen on February 11, 2022, with cafes and shops in more than 12 acres of bulb-filled grounds. For those who want to linger, cabins overlooking the snowdrops are available by the day for up to six people, complete with chairs and blankets. Linger longer in Easton’s shed, converted into three open-plan apartments (from £ 80 a night) or his gatehouse (from £ 92; sawdays.co.uk) to access the gardens afterwards the departure of visitors.
Adult £ 8.25, visiteaston.co.uk

Rococo Painswick Garden, Gloucestershire

People walk past a carpet of blooming snowdrops at Painswick Rococo Garden, Painswick, Gloucestershire.2ATWK8M People walk past a carpet of blooming snowdrops at Painswick Rococo Garden, Painswick, Gloucestershire.
Path to Glory: A carpet of snowdrops at Painswick Rococo Garden, Gloucestershire. Photograph: PA Images / Alamy

First laid out in the 18th century, decidedly asymmetrical and filled with pastel-hued Gothic follies, Painswick is Britain’s only surviving Rococo garden. In the middle of a valley with paths, streams and beeches, more than five million snowdrops emerge each year, offering an austere but wonderfully unified color palette. Within walking distance of the gardens, the Falcon Inn (doubles from £ 139 B&B; thefalconpainswick.com) has a full assortment of Cotswold honeyed stone charm to augment a visit.
Adult £ 9.60, rococogarden.org.uk

Anglesey Abbey, Cambridgeshire

Snowdrops in the woods at Anglesey Abbey in Cambridgeshire
Walk in the woods: Anglesey Abbey in Cambridgeshire has over 2,000 varieties of snowdrops. Photograph: PA Images / Alamy

Possibly introduced by the Romans, loved by medieval monks and seized by the Victorians, winter-flowering snowdrops (Galanthus) are the first heralds of the coming spring. This National Trust estate, with the remains of a 13th-century priory, Jacobean mansion, watermill and gardens, has one of Britain’s best collections – over 2,000 varieties of the delicately drooping white flower. Note in particular the rare Galanthus lagodechianus, discovered by former head gardener Richard Ayres at the site of the garden’s Victorian garbage heap, which can now be seen in all its snow-capped glory.
Adult from £ 10, nationaltrust.org.uk

Bromwich Hall Castle Gardens, West Midlands

Entrance and view of Castle Bromwich Hall
Spring Festival: Castle Bromwich Hall, home to Brum’s best snowdrops. Photograph: Robert Hackett / Alamy

Brum’s best snowdrops are found in the gardens of this Jacobean mansion; their flowering marks the arrival of spring and is celebrated with family days on weekends. But these gardens, rediscovered and saved by locals in the 1980s – open Wednesday through Sunday – are a pleasure to visit any time of the year, with volunteer guided tours, evening candle light walks and a courtyard cafe serving hot drinks and snacks.
Adult £ 4, Castlebromwichhallgardens.org.uk

Wrest Park, Bedfordshire

Wrest Park, an English heritage property
Perfect conditions: Snowdrops bloom among the trees in Wrest Park in Bedfordshire. Photograph: Keith Taylor / Alamy

Snowdrops propagate naturally – as long as they have trees to cluster around – and this English heritage property provides the perfect incubation conditions. They also have a lot of winter company here; Frost-resistant companions include cheekbones, scarlet berries, and mistletoe balls, while in greenhouses the first camellias begin to bloom. Within the park, Wrest Park has the aptly named Gardener’s House which lets you explore the park after hours (six people, three nights from £ 625).
Adult from £ 12.60, English- heritage.org.uk

Tregoose, Cornwall

Early flowering: snowdrops at Tregoose in Cornwall, the first to flower in Britain.
Early Flowering: Snowdrops at Tregoose in Cornwall are the first to flower in Britain. Photograph: David Chapman / Alamy

Thanks to the warming effects of the Gulf Stream, Cornish snowdrops usually bloom before anywhere else in Britain. Head to the Roseland Peninsula and you’ll start to see them in mid-January. At Tregoose, a garden built over 30 years by Alison O’Connor, they mingle with daffodils, including the early flowering Cedric Morris. Alison and her husband, Anthony, have bed and breakfasts in their Regency home, near other renowned gardens. Doublefrom £ 120, B&B, tregoose.co.uk

Shaftesbury, Dorset

Gold Hill, Shaftesbury, Dorset, England
Steep Climb: A series of walks celebrates the love story of this famous hilly Dorset town with snowdrops. Photograph: Guy Edwardes Photography / Alamy

A series of walks have been created to celebrate this famous hilly Dorset town’s love affair with snowdrops, ranging from a short stroll through the Abbey Gardens to a five kilometer yomp to hone l ‘appetite. As in previous years, the city hopes to end the snowdrop season with a festival combining lanterns in the shape of snowdrops, willow and paper, conferences of specialists and sale of bulbs. Close to the Abbey, the Grosvenor Arms makes a good base (from £ 95, B&B).
treesburysnowdrops.org

Welford Park, Berkshire

Bridge the gap: snowdrops at Welford Park in Berkshire.
Bridge the gap: snowdrops at Welford Park in Berkshire. Photograph: Dean Floyd / Alamy

This seven-acre estate, the site of a hunting lodge for Henry VIII, had summer fame as a former base for The Great British Cake. However, by the end of winter, its woods and riverbanks are filled with snowdrops, the first thought to have been planted by monks in Norman times and more recent additions by owner Deborah Puxley. Over 150 different varieties are to be discovered for galantophiles during the snowdrop season (February 2 to March 6) when the park is also open to the public and offers plant stands, including specialized nurseries on certain days.
Adult £ 10, welfordpark.co.uk

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2021 in quotes: artists talk about the pandemic, their practice, and their passions https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/2021-in-quotes-artists-talk-about-the-pandemic-their-practice-and-their-passions/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 20:36:12 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/2021-in-quotes-artists-talk-about-the-pandemic-their-practice-and-their-passions/ One of the joys of working at Georgia Straight is to be able to shine the spotlight on those of the artistic community that amaze us and make us think about the world in different ways. For this year-end issue, we’ve rounded up some quotes from some of the artists who appeared in our journal […]]]>

One of the joys of working at Georgia Straight is to be able to shine the spotlight on those of the artistic community that amaze us and make us think about the world in different ways. For this year-end issue, we’ve rounded up some quotes from some of the artists who appeared in our journal in 2021.

“I realized a lot last year that art is medicine. And we’re not going through any of the horrors that exist – whether it’s around the pandemic or the oppression of people – without art. “

—Dancer and choreographer Ziyian Kwan

“If you know what makes you tick, you’ll be a better singer. “

—Soprano Measha Brueggergosman

“Feeling ‘thirsty’ or ashamed that we are not enough… I was like, ‘You know what? No! I’m going to call some bullshit on this and say that the fact that we can straddle two types of cultures is our superpower. “

– Canadian Punjabi singer, actor, dancer and choreographer Krystal Kiran

“I think this work arose out of a form of pain – or screaming – that I had to suppress for too long.”

—Metis visual artist Émilie Régnier on her exploration of hair and identity in a Capture Photography Festival exhibition titled How do you love me?

“It’s like a TED talk but without that conference feeling. This is a real personal story. There is no specific call to action or take away.

– Chutzpah! festival artist Ophira Eisenberg on her love of storytelling

“I skipped school to go listen to Itzhak Perlman. So having this moment of leading the VSO with Perlman playing the solo was a really, really special experience.

– Music director of VSO Otto Tausk

“When you say you love yourself, it’s an act of defiance. When you tell your children that you love them, it’s an act of defiance… All of these things have been taken away from us.

—Heart of the City Festival Artist in Residence and Residential School Survivor Kat Zu’comulwat Norris

“I saw a middle aged couple kissing on the patio of a restaurant and I just wanted to capture that emotion in their relationship, the happiness. But I figured if I gave it a romantic title, this would suck. So I called it My Mate Is in Real Estate because they looked pretty wealthy.

—Vancouver Eastside Culture Crawl Artist Michelle Mathias

“I want to speak like myself. I mean the truth. And I want to be brave even at the risk of making mistakes. I already had to harden myself because some people disagree with things in the book.

—Ian Williams, author of Disorientation: being black in the world

“I try to find the rhythm in everything I do and everything I see, and I have no trouble doing that, because it’s everywhere. You just have to be receptive to it.”

percussionist Sal Ferreras

“I learned to sing before I spoke, so technically I always sang. In fact, I was also able to harmonize when I was a toddler, which is an interesting story about me. “

singer Janelle Reid

“It sounds impressionistic and not so evidence-based at this point, but I think there is an impulse in our community to get as close to whiteness as possible. I mean, I feel like I’m – literally – biologically a product of that in some ways. “

—Canad-Japanese Métis writer and filmmaker Angela May

“I learned a lot about my art through a western lens, through western stories, so I think doing things in Tagalog or thinking through a Tagalog lens allows for an alternate perspective, a different point of view. “

—Visual artist Patrick Cruz

“It takes a lot of self-discipline to keep training and keep working your body and trying to keep your instrument in a state where you can be seen by an audience. And at the same time, it takes a lot of letting go of the body. control, to let your vulnerability be seen, to let people see who you are.

—Actor-dancer Billy Marchenski

“I was in pre-law at UBC and discovered that the legal world was nowhere as fun, exciting and visceral as I thought it would be. So I started taking acting classes at UBC, and as soon as I started doing plays in college, I fell in love with it. And I realized, ‘Okay, I’m going to have to tell my mother and father that I will become an actor. ‘ “

Aaron Craven, Artistic Director of Mitch and Murray Productions

“I want to make Vancouver as culturally rich as possible. There are a lot of these different pockets of communities – comedians, poets, horror movie fans, burlesque artists – so I feel like that we have a scene here, and we have the potential to make it richer. It’s just about people staying here and making it great. “

Corinne Lea, owner of the Rio Theater

“The people of Vancouver are just amazing. And nothing has been clearer to me about how truly wonderful people are than how they have responded to this pandemic. People have been nice, people have to every time tried to pull themselves together and tried to do the right thing, and it’s just amazing. “

Chor Leoni artistic director Erick Lichte

“I grew up in Saskatchewan where he can be 40 under. Even if it rains here [in Vancouver] it’s better.”

Vancouver Art Gallery Audain Curator of British Columbia Art, Grant Arnold

“We have a lot of professional artists – a lot of dancers, actors, directors and designers – so it’s a very vibrant arts and cultural scene. Some of it seems to be unknown to a lot of people, but we’re not just a place people come to shoot movies. “

Donna Spencer, Artistic Producer of the Firehall Arts Center

“We see conductors, choreographers, writers, musicians and everything in this city time and time again. I don’t think it’s recognized as much for its arts and culture scene, but … any week you can experience a lot of contrasting shows and pieces that are truly first class. “

Vancouver Bach Choir Music Director, Leslie Dala

“One of the things I love the most is how [Vancouver] enveloped and how it envelops nature. It’s by far the smallest town I’ve lived in, so I feel like it still has a lot of memories of the natural world. I mean, you got the killer whale coming into the harbor for god’s sake. It’s incredible.”

Sirish Rao, Artistic Director of the Indian Summer Festival

“I mean, I’m a fan of gore, definitely. People know through my work that I have a very dark side, and I’m very mysterious like that… So throw me all the gore, please. pleases. “

horror director Gigi Saul Guerrero

Following

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Attend a talk by photographer Steve McCurry at the Xposure Photography Festival in Sharjah https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/attend-a-talk-by-photographer-steve-mccurry-at-the-xposure-photography-festival-in-sharjah/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 11:26:15 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/attend-a-talk-by-photographer-steve-mccurry-at-the-xposure-photography-festival-in-sharjah/ For its sixth event, the Xposure International Photography Festival will extend its duration to one week compared to its typical four-day structure, with its annual program of exhibitions, conferences, workshops and equipment sales taking place from February 9 to 15 at the Expo Center Sharjah. This year the festival will feature more than 55 renowned […]]]>

For its sixth event, the Xposure International Photography Festival will extend its duration to one week compared to its typical four-day structure, with its annual program of exhibitions, conferences, workshops and equipment sales taking place from February 9 to 15 at the Expo Center Sharjah.

This year the festival will feature more than 55 renowned photographers from around the world. Among those on the list is Steve McCurry, a Magnum member, whose body of work covers conflict, as well as ancient traditions and cultures.

Among his best-known portraits is an image of a young Afghan refugee (“Afghan Girl”) which he photographed in 1984. He will also speak with Aidan Sullivan about his life and career on February 14. All discussions are open to the public. , but visitors must register for tickets online before the event

Other photographers, such as Alain Schroeder, will also be present. Schroeder, whose work on orangutans and child jockeys has won him World Press Photo awards, will discuss the stories behind his images, also on February 14. Photographer Chris Rainier, who is known for photographing indigenous tribes around the world, will talk about his 40-year career and the importance of documenting culture on February 11.

The festival will also feature talks by Alan Schaller, Jennifer Hayes, Vineet Vohra, Jeffrey Garriock, as well as National geography photographer David Doubilet, concept photographer Debi Cornwall and environmental photojournalist Aaron Gekoski, among others. The full list of participating photographers is on the Xposure website.

Tariq Saeed Allay, Director General of the Sharjah Government Media Office, which organizes the festival, said: “Xposure has become one of the most important events in Sharjah’s annual cultural calendar. He said the event “facilitates a better understanding and appreciation of the diversity of human experience and cultures, and raises awareness of the trauma and impacts of conflict while drawing attention to relevant issues affecting the planet.”

Showcasing a range of photographic styles and subjects, the festival emphasized images that highlight the importance of the natural environment, as well as photographic practices that touch on contemporary issues.

Last year, the festival featured the works of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Muhammed Muheisen, who showed a young refugee girl named Zahra Mahmoud in the 2016 and 2020s. Brian Hodges’ photographic series on students in Uganda to help to raise awareness of the Organization of African Women Rising.

Xposure will also open GalleryX, a new venue in the Al Majaz Amphitheater that will showcase the work of photographers participating in the festival throughout the year. The gallery opened in February, but the organization has yet to host its first exhibition. It is expected to continue its program of shows throughout the year in 2022.

More details on the event’s conference and workshop program will be announced early next year.

The Xposure International Photography Festival will run from Wednesday to Tuesday February 9 to 15. More information on xposure.ae

Update: December 28, 2021 11:29 a.m.

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Do you consider yourself to be a Charleston arts lover? So here’s what you should be doing in 2022 | Chroniclers https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/do-you-consider-yourself-to-be-a-charleston-arts-lover-so-heres-what-you-should-be-doing-in-2022-chroniclers/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/do-you-consider-yourself-to-be-a-charleston-arts-lover-so-heres-what-you-should-be-doing-in-2022-chroniclers/ When it comes to the future of the arts in Charleston, now is the time to be resolved. In my weekly column and elsewhere, I have mentioned more than once that we are entering a new chapter in the local art scene. A wave of artistic leaders has recently landed in Charleston and South Carolina. […]]]>

When it comes to the future of the arts in Charleston, now is the time to be resolved.

In my weekly column and elsewhere, I have mentioned more than once that we are entering a new chapter in the local art scene.

A wave of artistic leaders has recently landed in Charleston and South Carolina. Over the past decade, a multi-million dollar aggregate of renovations has put us in good shape with glitzy and chic concert halls and performance spaces. Private finance trends promise to strengthen marginalized voices here too.

That being said, these leaders are still navigating a pandemic while dealing with cultural biorhythms that may or may not make sense today.

And while these buildings can be fancy, renting them out is often prohibitively expensive, with only a few established businesses having set up shop there. Speaking of rents, the uncontrolled development has caused many artists to leave the peninsula, and even to leave the Lowcountry.

And, yes, new support is a godsend, but the process is difficult to find those who haven’t had a seat at the arts fundraising table.

Don't let the glare fool you.  Charleston's art scene remains in recovery mode.

Here is the bright side. A collective effort can address many of these challenges, as it has done in other cities under similar pressures. If you are one of those who understands how crucial the arts are to our community, here are some resolutions to ensure a vibrant and vibrant arts scene in 2022.

Get out of the black box

As development continues in Charleston, making room for the arts is all the more intimidating. Artists and art lovers must imagine new ways of interacting with the works and seek partnerships with members of the community to mount productions, exhibitions and events in non-traditional spaces.

Consider the repeated use of Battery Gadsden by the Pure Theater on Sullivan’s Island, as well as its recent outdoor staging at their home at the Cannon Street Arts Center when the pandemic persisted. Last year, the Village Repertory Company bid farewell to its Woolfe Street Playhouse home, but continued performing, playing musical journals at places like the Tradesman Brewing Company while determining a more permanent venue.






Ephrat Asherie (copy) (copy)

New York-based Ephrat Asherie and company performed at the College of Charleston’s Rivers Green as part of the Spoleto Festival USA 2021. Photo by William Struhs. Spoleto Festival USA / Supplied


Last May, Piccolo Spoleto brought Cannon Park to life, opening the scaled-down, safety-focused festival with CSO Brass from the Charleston Symphony and others dazzling a thrilled crowd, and featured outdoor pop-ups, including a Bluegrass walk in Hampton Park.

Spoleto Festival USA’s pandemic pivot of an elegant stage at the College of Charleston’s Rivers Green was an outdoor sensation. It prompted me to contemplate the possibilities of such a space. If our community finds a way to keep it running during the summer months on a quiet campus, perhaps it could accommodate artists and works. So it gets crowded these days in the city after all.

Walk the promenade

Do me a favor by dusting off the old but appropriate adage that love is a verb. As the arts rebound from the total closure of performance venues, our love of the arts must be action-oriented.

In November, the Charleston Literary Festival rolled out a hybrid model of its annual Conversation List, with in-person and virtual events. The festival also filmed some of them to share in the coming weeks.

Musical organizations like the Charleston Symphony and Charleston Jazz have improved their virtual playing during the pandemic and will continue to offer the public the opportunity to enjoy works in this way.

As we continue to fight the coronavirus this winter, consider throwing an online jazz concert over dinner. Bring out the wine and cheese for a local literary conference or start a book club focused on hosting Charleston-related authors.

Make it a point to keep the scene going through this final stage of uncertainty, if only from the safety and comfort of your sofa.

So speak the speech

When you appreciate the cultural offerings, share them. Word of mouth is a powerful force in driving ticket sales and increasing awareness of the arts.

Spice up your social media platforms with your activities. Start a meaningful exchange on a work of art. Imagine how richer our streams would be with new impressions from last night’s concert or a sizzling new play.

Algorithmically speaking, such repeated posting could even create more digital space for the arts amidst the sarcastic and the silly. (It means you, baby monkey riding a pig backwards.)

Love risk taking

This fall, the real need for arts organizations to fill seats has resulted in a fall season that is seen as risk averse. When the arts world picks up with heightened confidence, stand up for creative derring-do.






pc-102621-ne-latraviata-11.jpg (copy)

Holy City Arts & Lyric Opera, known as HALO, kick off its first season with the 1980s production of “La traviata” at Joseph P. Riley Jr .. Stephen Massar / Special for The Post and Courier


Receive a weekly recap of South Carolina’s opinions and analysis from The Post and Courier delivered to your inbox Monday night.

In October, Holy City Arts & Lyric Opera bravely performed “La Traviata” on the grounds of the non-traditional space of Joseph P. Riley Jr. Park, poignantly and inventively placing it in the 1980s during the dark days of another health crisis, AIDS. . For its 2022 lineup, Spoleto Festival USA has announced three operas with reimagined or even inverted narratives to reinvigorate the art form.

The stage is set for a new chapter of Charleston's Spoleto Festival with 3 operas in 2022

Stay relevant

Works of art offer a proven way to tackle difficult and controversial topics and influence change. Let’s keep coming.






Visual vigil

In the “Visual Vigil” exhibit, visitors were invited to join the conversation by writing a message on a strip of paper. Maura Hogan / File



This summer, the City Gallery presented “Visual Vigil”, a reflective and respectful exhibition by artist Susan Perkins conceived as “an active conversation on the effects of mass shootings”.

Working with Friends of Gadsden Creek, the Redux Contemporary Art Center explored the intersection of creative practice and cultural impact with an emphasis on social justice in “Tidal Futures: Friends of Gadsden Creek,” a exhibition consisting of photographs, installations and a timeline of the main events that impact the land and life around the stream.

The Gibbes Museum of Art has programmed around the traveling exhibition “Romare Bearden: Abstraction”, which highlighted the unfounded omission of a black artist from the canon of modern art. His distinguished lecture series featured charismatic artist Steve Locke, who spoke about the design of monuments and memorials, a topic that resonates in a city that strives to better reflect its community.

Challenge the norms. Push the envelopes. Break down barriers. Let’s trigger a meaningful exchange with each mounted work.

Keep appearing

On a wild Saturday for the holidays, The Restoration hotel gifted The Port, its event space adjacent to Wentworth Street, to the potters at Studio Union in Charleston. There, King Street shoppers perused beautiful, locally-made ceramics, all in elusive, prime real estate.

Earlier this year, Ben D’Allesandro of D’Allesandro’s Pizza handed the keys to a new location on Upper King Street to staff member Marie Carladous. While temporarily vacant, she opened the Gap Gallery, a series of art exhibitions in space that gave dozens of emerging artists a place to show their work.

If a local business has an open space, or even a place in a display case, they may consider allowing an artist to make temporary use of it. It’s good for art (and for the heart too).

Keep your eyes on the future

It means you kids. Organizations that have used their pandemic downtime to ramp up education awareness have done a lot to educate the next generation of art lovers.

In January 2021, Charleston Gaillard Center’s educational and community program “Setting the Stage,” an eight-part video series providing students with a fiery glimpse behind Gaillard’s plush burgundy curtain, all in the name of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).






CofC Arts under the Oaks dancer (copy)

Students from the College of Charleston’s School of the Arts perform at Arts Under the Oaks, Stono Preserve, Hollywood. Mike Ledford / College of Charleston / Supplied




This fall, Charleston Stage launched its CityStage community engagement initiative, which features large-scale productions in schoolyards, local parks, libraries and community centers, enjoying live performances to connect with young audiences and their families, especially those from underserved communities.

The College of Charleston School of the Arts demonstrated to its students that the show must go on, featuring the two-day “Arts under the Oaks” outdoor showcase of theater, dance, opera and more.

Question-and-Author: director James Ivory hops in Charleston

Keep showing up

If you haven’t attended a Charleston City Council meeting recently, or if you haven’t zoomed in, you’ve seen how citizens speak out on issues that matter to them.

Charleston artists bemoan the city’s dearth of public art. We all know the frustration with the relentless development of the Charleston area, and many artists can no longer afford to live in Charleston.

Let’s make organized efforts on behalf of the arts in the public domain. These could take the form of calls for initiatives like Percent for Art programs, which can force developers to give back to the arts.






Riley the Tech Dog in 'Setting the Stage' (copy)

Riley the tech dog gets a starring role in Charleston Gaillard Center’s “Setting the Stage,” an eight-part science-teaching video series. Charleston Gaillard Center / Supplied


Now is the time to voice the need for such programs and to weigh in on others in the making, like the public-private Lowcountry Lowline, which provides a community art infusion.

As King Street moves forward with its business improvement district, Charleston’s creative sector should identify ways to partner with businesses to revive the artery with the arts.

If we walk into this next chapter as passive members of the audience, we just might get what we put into it. But imagine this. If we all work to demonstrate the power and poignant character of a relevant, holistic and innovative scene, our love of the arts might just look like action.

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Alexandria photographer Daniel Horowitz named official artist of the National Bell Festival https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/alexandria-photographer-daniel-horowitz-named-official-artist-of-the-national-bell-festival/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 17:49:49 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/alexandria-photographer-daniel-horowitz-named-official-artist-of-the-national-bell-festival/ Daniel Horowitz in a self-portrait (Courtesy of the photographer) ALEXANDRIA, VA – The ringing of bells will soon fill the air. At 2 p.m. on New Years Day, the third annual National Bell Festival takes place, an event that promotes harmony through bell music nationwide. Churches and cathedrals are invited to join in the celebration, […]]]>
Daniel Horowitz in a self-portrait (Courtesy of the photographer)

ALEXANDRIA, VA – The ringing of bells will soon fill the air. At 2 p.m. on New Years Day, the third annual National Bell Festival takes place, an event that promotes harmony through bell music nationwide. Churches and cathedrals are invited to join in the celebration, as well as parks and memorials. individuals are also welcome.

Daniel Horowitz, a photographer based in Alexandria, has been selected as the official festival artist for 2022.

What is the goal of the official festival artist? The zebra contacted Paul Ashe, director of the National Bell Festival, for an explanation.

“Each year, our official festival artist helps us bring the beauty of bells even closer to people by presenting bells and steeples as true works of art,” he said. “Whether through oil paintings, watercolors, photographs, digital illustrations or any other medium, the official festival artist visually captures what everyone hears: a fabulous ringtone from the New Year ! “

For his interpretation of the bells as art, Horowitz selected a photograph of the Netherlands Carillion, the 127-foot-high steeple in Arlington, a gift from the Dutch after WWII. The monument – designed by Dutch architect Joost WC Boks and inaugurated in May 1960 – has 52 bells, including those recently installed in honor of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., Elanor Roosevelt and Secretary George C. Marshall. It is currently under renovation and should be refitted in early 2022.

Arlington Dutch carillon undergoes restoration, adds bells

Asked about his reaction to being named the festival’s official artist, Horowitz told The Zebra: “I learned of the selection on December 9 and was naturally delighted. I have always loved bells and belfries and the sound of bells, so I was delighted to be selected as the Artist of the 2022 Festival. In addition, the photograph of the Dutch carillon is definitely one of my favorites of 2021. “

Horowitz’s image, titled ‘Netherlands Carilllon, Moonlight’, will appear on the cover of the official festival guide. A limited edition of 50 copies will be available, with the money raised helping to restore bells and spiers across the United States.

“Netherlands Carillon, Moonlight” by Daniel Horowitz (Courtesy of the photographer)

The photo is a six-minute exhibit, taken during Harvest Moon in September. While filming, he used a tripod weighted down by a sandbag and exposed the image for that exact amount of time. That night, the sky had broken the cloud cover and clouds were drifting beyond the tower during the exhibit.

The photographer shared that in this image, “the fluffy shapes of the moving clouds seem to emphasize the geometric solidity of the steeple, which looks very still and resilient.” He added: “The moonlight brings out a lot of subtle reflections on the sides of the tower, which are not so noticeable during the day.”

Horowitz trained in photography at the Art League School, Rhode Island School of Design, MassArt, and the Capital Photography Center. His work has been featured in The Zebra, the Alexandria Times, and the Naval Historical Society Magazine. It has been exhibited in various locations around the city, including the Alexandria Black History Museum, the Athenaeum, and the League of the Arts Gallery.

The distinction of Official Artist of the Festival is one of the highest he has received for photography. (A print of his photo will be given to the Ambassador of the Netherlands to commemorate this historic event and the restoration of the tower.)

“With all of the current challenges of the pandemic, it’s wonderful to have something positive like the Bell Festival, and I’m proud to contribute all I can to this effort.”

(Note: Would you like to purchase the image? Horowitz plans to sell the remaining copies of the limited-to-50 special edition on his Etsy site, dclensman.etsy.com.)

Alexandria Mother and Daughter author of a series of children’s books to raise awareness of disability


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WISH hosts discuss mental health and creative workshops at GA Festival 2021 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/wish-hosts-discuss-mental-health-and-creative-workshops-at-ga-festival-2021/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 06:40:00 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/wish-hosts-discuss-mental-health-and-creative-workshops-at-ga-festival-2021/ Participants in a program hosted by WISH during the Generation Amazing Festival 2021. Doha: The World Health Innovation Summit (WISH) recently participated in the Generation Amazing Festival 2021 as part of its ongoing partnership with the Supreme Committee for Childbirth and Inheritance. The festival, which ran from December 14-18, aimed to inspire a generation committed […]]]>

Participants in a program hosted by WISH during the Generation Amazing Festival 2021.

Doha: The World Health Innovation Summit (WISH) recently participated in the Generation Amazing Festival 2021 as part of its ongoing partnership with the Supreme Committee for Childbirth and Inheritance.

The festival, which ran from December 14-18, aimed to inspire a generation committed to social change through the power of sport. This year’s theme, “All In”, focused on the role of young people in the development of their community.

During the festival, WISH, the global health initiative of the Qatar Foundation (QF), organized and organized several activities for festival participants – mainly young people aged 16 to 25 from Qatar and the Arab region.

These included art and photography workshops and a roundtable focused on mental health and sport.

Nick Bradshaw, Director of Partnerships and Outreach at WISH, said: “We wanted to be involved in this year’s Generation Amazing festival because we believe in the power of sport to create positive social impact and promote good physical and mental health. .

“For young people in particular, the ability of sport to shape their lives for the better should not be underestimated. This is especially true when you think about the negative impact that the events of the past two years have had on the mental health of our younger population. Access to and participation in sporting activities must be both protected and encouraged.

WISH hosted a panel discussion titled “Reaching Your Goals: Tips from Sports Professionals for Maintaining a Healthy Mind in a Competitive World”, which was also broadcast virtually and is available on WISH’s YouTube channel.

Moderated by Nicky Crosby, presenter at beIN Sports, the session brought together a range of current and former athletes to discuss their own experiences with mental health and the role sport plays in fostering positive mental well-being.

Speakers included an impressive number of former professional footballers, including Qatar-based Netherlands international Nigel De Jong; Qatari footballer and founder and board member of the Qatar Players Association, Abdulaziz Al Sulaiti; France and Manchester United international, Louis Saha; and former Paris Saint Germain and Italy player Arianna Criscione.

“You have to have mental toughness to be successful as an athlete, and self-confidence has to be the number one priority,” commented De Jong. “In tough times, having the mentality to come back better and stronger is key. Approach challenges as a “minor setback for a big comeback” and don’t be afraid to ask mental health questions or speak up. “

Saha recalled how he responded to negative comments during his career: “I have always seen comments from a coach, mentor or teacher as positive – I took them as opportunities and I trusted them to be able to grow from these moments. If I could give one piece of advice, it would be to take on any challenge and stay genuine.

Criscione advised against today’s comparative culture: “People are afraid to talk about how they feel because they think it will ruin their careers. If you compare yourself, you will always be disappointed and you won’t be focusing on improving yourself.

Alexandra Chalat, Director of Community Engagement and World Cup Legacy for the Qatar Foundation, spoke about QF’s many sporting initiatives, including the WISH and Liverpool Football Club capacity-tailored program launched in 2017. Chalat shared her thoughts on the importance of making sport participation fully inclusive, regardless of ability or gender, and the benefits of actively participating in competitive sport.

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4th Al Batayeh Festival To Showcase Cultural Spectrum https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/4th-al-batayeh-festival-to-showcase-cultural-spectrum/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 14:36:53 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/4th-al-batayeh-festival-to-showcase-cultural-spectrum/ Sharjah 24: The meeting of the organizing committee of the Al Batayeh 4 folk festival was chaired on Sunday morning by Abdullah Sultan bin Salumah Al Ketbi, director of the municipality of Al Batayeh, who approved the agenda of the main festival events, community initiatives, working committees and health committee for the implementation of all […]]]>
Sharjah 24: The meeting of the organizing committee of the Al Batayeh 4 folk festival was chaired on Sunday morning by Abdullah Sultan bin Salumah Al Ketbi, director of the municipality of Al Batayeh, who approved the agenda of the main festival events, community initiatives, working committees and health committee for the implementation of all precautionary and preventive measures within the festival, as well as the festival opening hours, which take place in the Al Batayeh public park.
The fourth edition of the Al Batayeh festival will start on January 6 and run until January 27, 2022 as part of the Sharjah shopping promotions, organized by the Sharjah Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the festival’s strategic partner.

Bin Salumah underlined the commitment of the festival organizing committee to diversity and multiplicity of events and activities in order to meet the diverse interests of all participants.

A range of traditional artistic performances and competitions will take place at the festival theater.

Health actions throughout the days of the festival, but also heritage and sporting actions, but also drawing, sculpture, photography for children, cinema and theater courses for children.

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FotoFest founder Fred Baldwin trumpeted the importance of photography https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/fotofest-founder-fred-baldwin-trumpeted-the-importance-of-photography/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 21:35:14 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/fotofest-founder-fred-baldwin-trumpeted-the-importance-of-photography/ Fred Baldwin’s career began almost by accident with a lucky meeting with Pablo Picasso in 1955, giving the young photographer the opportunity to take pictures of the famous artist. Baldwin’s documentary photography has spanned decades and continents, notably covering the civil rights movement. But perhaps his most enduring legacy in Houston will be the co-creation […]]]>

Fred Baldwin’s career began almost by accident with a lucky meeting with Pablo Picasso in 1955, giving the young photographer the opportunity to take pictures of the famous artist. Baldwin’s documentary photography has spanned decades and continents, notably covering the civil rights movement. But perhaps his most enduring legacy in Houston will be the co-creation of FotoFest, an arts organization dedicated to promoting photography in the city.

Baldwin died on Friday at the age of 92. He leaves a long and rich legacy as a photographer and educator that predates FotoFest, a part of his life that he documented in his 2019 memoir, “Dear Mr. Picasso: An Illustrated Love Story with Freedom” . And he also leaves behind a city deeply indebted to him and his partner / fellow photographer Wendy Watriss. There is certainly a huge debt for FotoFest, which they started in 1983 after observing Rencontres Photographiques d’Arles, a French photography festival that was launched two decades earlier.

FotoFest director Steven Evans called Baldwin “unstoppable, visionary. An incredible storyteller.

“And he was incredibly full of life, full of adventure and achievement,” says Evans. “But I don’t think Fred was trying to be successful. It was a by-product of his willingness to do good things and bring people together. Along with Wendy, he brought recognition to artistic corners of the world that were previously overlooked. And they did it before the Internet. They brought the concept of globalism to the work of photography.

The declared mission of FotoFest was and is to “bring together a global vision of art and intercultural exchange with a commitment to social issues, community engagement and the enrichment of cultural resources”.

Although FotoFest enjoys fame in Houston and around the world, its genesis grew out of the frustration of a system where photographic exhibitions were rigid and small-scale. Baldwin told The Chronicle in 2019, “We wanted to give back because we knew things. But it was also an act of anger.

The organization has achieved these goals early and often. FotoFest achieved international recognition for its biennial, the first of which was held in Houston in 1986. The event that gained momentum and fame over the next 35 years.

The growth of FotoFest has been outrageously rapid, suggesting an artistic need that is under-represented in a large urban center. Four years after the start of the biennial, FotoFest has taken to traveling shows. Also in 1990, the organization pioneered Literacy Through Photography, which introduced the art form to classrooms and community centers.

Baldwin told The Chronicle that he lived in 22 homes by the age of 11, starting with his birth in Switzerland. The itinerant youth was, initially, the result of his father’s work as a diplomat. Baldwin’s father died when the boy was 5, but the movement continued as his mother moved from place to place, country to country, spending time with her family and his friends.

Formal schooling was a failure for the rebellious young man, whose winding path through several high schools took him to the University of Virginia, where he failed to complete his freshman year. He joined the Marines and fought in the Korean War.

After meeting and photographing Picasso, he returned to the United States, settled in Georgia, where he began to make family portraits, while launching globetrotting adventures conducive to photography.

“My early adventures for magazine stories were all ego trips, there’s no question about it,” he said.

But being based in the South in the 1950s and 1960s, Baldwin saw history that required documentation. He photographed a Ku Klux Klan rally in Alabama in 1957, then photographed civil rights protests and Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.

He met Watriss in 1970, a life-changing event. He told The Chronicle that what ensued was “a love affair with life but also with someone who might share a concern about how to give back something you have learned to the world.”

They worked side by side from that point on. Their work has been archived by the Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin.

On the acquisition, Don Carleton, executive director of the Briscoe Center, praised the two for working “tirelessly to capture the changing character of American life. They did so with remarkable dexterity, elegance and patience.

But their patience waned in the 1970s with the way photography was viewed by local, regional, national and international art institutions. Baldwin was teaching photojournalism at the University of Houston when he and Watriss started FotoFest, which served as a large umbrella platform for various artistic activities: education, celebration, conservation. They regularly worked with renowned photographers, while also helping young aspiring photographers find some of their first breaks.

“Fred was someone who was able to create energy,” Evans said. “And inspire others to harness their energy and potential to achieve and do good things in the world.”

Baldwin is survived by Watriss; sons Grattan Baldwin and Breck Baldwin; her granddaughter Anika Baldwin and her sister-in-law Judith M. Baldwin.

andrew.dansby@chron.com

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Generation Amazing Festival focuses on the power of football to transform communities https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/generation-amazing-festival-focuses-on-the-power-of-football-to-transform-communities/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 05:33:00 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/generation-amazing-festival-focuses-on-the-power-of-football-to-transform-communities/ Yesterday, officials, guests and youth representatives at the opening ceremony of the Generation Amazing Festival 2021 in Education City. Photo: Salim Matramkot / The Peninsula Generation Amazing Festival 2021, an event intended to inspire a generation committed to social change through the power of sport started yesterday in Education City in the presence of more […]]]>

Yesterday, officials, guests and youth representatives at the opening ceremony of the Generation Amazing Festival 2021 in Education City. Photo: Salim Matramkot / The Peninsula

Generation Amazing Festival 2021, an event intended to inspire a generation committed to social change through the power of sport started yesterday in Education City in the presence of more than a hundred young people.
Organized in partnership with the Qatar Foundation, the GA Festival 2021 offers a unique opportunity for young people across the region to experience the power of football and how it can be used to transform their communities.
“Generation Amazing’s legacy has impacted many people over the years. The theme of our third festival this year ‘All In’ emphasizes the vital role every young person must play in improving their community, ”Generation Amazing Program Director Nasser Al Khori said at the opening ceremony. The four-day GA Festival 2021 will focus on connecting young people aged 16-24 to the 2021 FIFA Arab Cup Qatar and creating sustainable learning experiences.
Qatar Foundation’s Community Development President Machaille Hassan Al Naimi said: “We are very happy to have more than 100 Arabs here for the festival in honor of the FIFA Arab Cup. . Over the next four days, I hope that the young participants will enjoy the Cité de l’Education.
“As a strategic partner, we are honored to be in so many ways. Not only by welcoming an amazing group of people with us, but by having different entities within the Qatar Foundation offer you sessions. This partnership really excites me, the impact we have together is powerful, ”she added.
The opening ceremony of the 2021 GA Festival featured Giles Duley, a photographer best known for his work on the long-term impact of war, sharing his incredible life story of being injured in an accident and then of stand on a land mine and lose three limbs. Duley explained how he harnessed his strength at an extremely difficult time in his life.
“Don’t think about the things you can’t control, but focus on the things you can. So excellent in these areas, ”Duley said of the young people and his speech received an emotional ovation from the audience. He also hosted a photography workshop yesterday. Mariam Al Dhubhani, an award-winning Yemeni-Russian journalist, filmmaker and curator also shared her experience working on a document on young war refugees.
The GA Festival 2021 will feature football development workshops and details on the recently announced “One Goal Arabia” program, which Generation Amazing has launched in collaboration with Aurora for Training and Development, the Asian Football Confederation and the African Confederation of Africa. soccer. Key themes will include the use of football as a tool for development and peace, solving social challenges, project management and implementation, as well as leadership and advocacy.
The festival will end with a football tournament for the good called “All In Game”, designed to maximize the results of the development of social skills. On the last day of the program, participants will watch the FIFA Arab Cup Final at Al Bayt Stadium.

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Emirates news agency – Xposure opens Gallery X on December 20 at Al Majaz Amphitheater https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/emirates-news-agency-xposure-opens-gallery-x-on-december-20-at-al-majaz-amphitheater/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 14:52:00 +0000 https://stevenwesleyphotography.com/emirates-news-agency-xposure-opens-gallery-x-on-december-20-at-al-majaz-amphitheater/ Tue 14-12-2021 18:52 SHARJAH, December 14, 2021 (WAM) – The Xposure International Photography Festival, hosted by the Sharjah Government Media Bureau (SGMB), provides an immersive photographic experience and makes art accessible year round with the launch of Gallery X, a permanent gallery dedicated to the presentation of a selection of works by some of the […]]]>

SHARJAH, December 14, 2021 (WAM) – The Xposure International Photography Festival, hosted by the Sharjah Government Media Bureau (SGMB), provides an immersive photographic experience and makes art accessible year round with the launch of Gallery X, a permanent gallery dedicated to the presentation of a selection of works by some of the best photographers in the world.

With a new exhibition presented each month, Gallery X – housed in the iconic Al Majaz Amphitheater in Sharjah will open its doors to the public from December 20, 2021, providing a unique opportunity to experience some of the best examples of the art of the photography and explore approaches to the medium throughout the year. The highly aesthetic collection celebrates the artistic excellence of talented emerging and acclaimed photographers around the world.

Ahead of Xposure 2022, Gallery X marks its debut with an astonishing collection of photographic prints by two award-winning international photographers, whose emotionally resonant works are rich in story. The new cultural and educational hotspot will also offer creators and emerging talents regular academic programs as well as expert workshops. It includes a café for visitors and an interactive reading space for photographers as well as those interested in the visual arts.

Gallery X will open with award-winning images by two internationally renowned photographers, Francesco Zizola and Anthony Lamb.

Tariq Saeed Allay, Director General of the Sharjah Government Media Office, said: “The permanent exhibition provides a lasting platform for amateur photographers, experts and the public to come together, learn and hone their skills through workshops and expert programs that will be available monthly throughout the year. “

“Gallery X aims to promote the position of the Al Majaz Amphitheater as a destination for art and creativity and builds on Xposure’s mission to offer the public the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the work of photographers world-renowned and to educate the community about the role of photography. in our life. The exhibition is an inclusive creative space that brings together photographers and the public and enriches the cultural landscape of Sharjah. “

Launched at Xposure 2021, Gallery X is a permanent gallery in Sharjah and aims to provide a new opportunity for photography enthusiasts to come together, learn, develop their skills and share their expertise.

WAM / Amjad Saleh / Hazem Hussein

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